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Blues

Authored by Chi Maybe
Edited by Erik Bernhardsson 

Publication Date: Apr 13 2014
ISBN/EAN13: 9187829010  / 978-9187829017 
Page Count: 52
Binding Type: US Trade Paper
Trim Size: 4.5” x 6”
Language: English
Color: Full Color with Bleed
Related Categories: Photography / Photoessays & Documentaries
$10

Viewer 2: Two Nights in Northbridge

Authored by Matthew Taggart
Edited by Erik Bernhardsson 


Perth, Australia
19112013 - 23112013

Publication Date: Apr 10 2014
ISBN/EAN13:  9187829002  / 978-9187829000 
Page Count: 52
Binding Type: US Trade Paper
Trim Size: 4.5” x 6”
Language: English
Color: Full Color with Bleed
Related Categories: Photography / Photoessays & Documentaries

$10

Is this us?

Authored by Leland Taylor

Dear whoever, 

My cousin and I went on an amazing, deviant trip across the USA in the summer of 2012.  Out of all the photos we took on our fancy cameras the photos I took on my crappy samsung flip phone are the most intimate and bring back the Richest memories.  I have well over 100photos to pick from.(knowing theres only room for 45 pages?)

This trip was completely self-sustained, no sponsors.  

The Title in mind is “Is this us?”, a phrase my cousin and I used often once the sun was setting.  The photo I submitted would be the cover I thought.  And under some photos use some of the anonymous questions people asked us.

The photos are full of malt liquor, road trash, and some kooky people we met along the way.

Please give it some thought.  Ill send more photos, just ask…

Leland Taylor

Publication Date: Mar 12 2014
ISBN10/ISBN13:   9198138898  / 978-9198138894
Page Count: 52
Binding Type: US Trade Paper
Trim Size: 4.5” x 6”
Language: English
Color: Full Color with Bleed
Related Categories: Photography / Photoessays & Documentaries

$10

Leland was the first to submit a book to Modes. He will be on our instagram from today until April 12.

Troublesome ‘96 

Authored by Erik Bernhardsson

PURE PLAYAZ
Just Bangin’ Clothes

52 cards
4.5” x 6” (11.43 x 15.24 cm) 
Full Color Bleed on White paper
ISBN-13: 978-9198138887 
ISBN-10: 919813888X 
BISAC: Design / Textile & Costume

$15 (Preview)

Viewer 1

Authored by Matthew Taggart
Edited by Erik Bernhardsson 


Perth, Australia
21102013 - 31102013

Publication Date: Feb 11 2014
ISBN/EAN13:  9198138847 / 978-9198138849
Page Count: 52
Binding Type: US Trade Paper
Trim Size: 4.5” x 6”
Language: English
Color: Full Color with Bleed
Related Categories: Photography / Photoessays & Documentaries

$10

Matthew will be on our instagram from today until March 11.

DDD

Authored by Chi Maybe
Edited by Erik Bernhardsson 


Dirty, Dusty, Disorder

Publication Date: Jan 10 2014
ISBN/EAN13: 9198138855 / 978-9198138856
Page Count: 52
Binding Type: US Trade Paper
Trim Size: 4.5” x 6”
Language: English
Color: Full Color with Bleed
Related Categories: Photography / Photoessays & Documentaries

$10

Chi will be on our instagram from today until Feb.10.

Hello (Submitted question)

How might one go about getting published?

Those interested in having a book published by Modes can make a draft of what they would like to publish, whether text or images, and submit it. We are interested in things that are small, loose, undefined, personal, exploratory, and whatever other type you might think fits well with these. Scroll through this site to see what we have published so far, and check out Modes Img and Modes China for a sense of what we do.

Travels in China

Authored by Feiman Du
Edited by Erik Bernhardsson 


The English publisher’s blurb bills the book as providing “a unique portrait of China at a time of turbulence and change seen through the eyes of the world’s greatest semiotician.”

Publication Date: Dec 9 2013 
ISBN/EAN13: 9198138839 / 9789198138832
Page Count: 154
Binding Type: US Trade Paper
Trim Size: 4.5” x 6”
Language: English
Color: Full Color with Bleed
Related Categories: Photography / Photoessays & Documentaries

$25

Fei will be displaying her work on the Modes Vu instagram, December 9th - January 9th.

今日深圳SHENZHEN TODAY

Feiman Du & Erik Bernhardsson

Special edition of 今日深圳SHENZHEN TODAY for the V&A’s Rapid Response Collection at the Shenzhen-Hong Kong Bi-city Biennale of Urbanism and Architecture (2013).

Edition of two, handmade in Shenzhen. Part of Victoria & Albert Museum’s permanent collection.

___


The way in which the internet will dissolve boundaries is by making us visible to each other. The child of the future who brings home drawings to stick on refrigerators, and things like that—in the future we won’t stick them on refrigerators, we will stick them on our website. And everything will go into our website.

By the time we’re adults, our website will be the size of a museum. And you can wander through it. And as a gesture of intimacy you can invite someone else to wander through it. Well that’s who you are—it’s your imagination. The cultural enterprise is an effort to turn ourselves inside out.

Boring landscape: Changchun

Authored by Cai Xiao
Edited by Erik Bernhardsson 


48 rather average images of Changchun city.


Publication Date: Nov 8 2013
ISBN/EAN13: 9198138820 / 978-9198138825
Page Count: 52
Binding Type: US Trade Paper
Trim Size: 4.5” x 6”
Language: English
Color: Full Color with Bleed
Related Categories: Photography / Photoessays & Documentaries

$10 

Cai Xiao will be displaying his work on the Modes Vu instagram, November 8th - December 8th.

Inner city

Authored by Di Cao 
Edited by Erik Bernhardsson 

60 images from the streets of central Beijing.


Publication Date: Oct 01 2013
ISBN/EAN13: 9198138812 / 9789198138818
Page Count: 64
Binding Type: US Trade Paper
Trim Size: 4.5” x 6”
Language: English
Color: Full Color with Bleed
Related Categories: Photography / Photoessays & Documentaries

$10

Clothing industry (Modes China)

Erik Bernhardsson

Boundless’ main inspiration is from two sources: one is the Chinese way of looking at things; the philosophy. Also the techniques of Chinese cutting, very flat cut, no draping or darts… it is interesting to see how the Chinese make clothes. Also traditionally we have different mentality of how we look at the body. Both Chinese and Japanese, we think the body should be covered, not shown to people. From ancient times Chinese and Japanese clothes were very loose. You cannot see the body directly. The materials were quite soft, normally made of silk cotton or linen. You can feel the shape of the body but you don’t actually see it. That enables more imagination.

Sexiness is expressed that way but not through the act of seeing. It is a different mentality and that is why we make clothes different from Europeans. Europeans tend to think that people should be proud of their body, so one function of the garment is to help show the form of the body, hence they make the hip part or the breasts look bigger, and invented cutting and sewing skills and techniques to realize these effects.

Another inspiration is ordinary life. It is interesting to see how everything is mixed: western things, Chinese things, old things, new things. Actually, it is quite a mess. Beijing is a mess. Sometimes I like this mess. It is bad taste, but interesting, and has much power.

Zhang Da

To go back to the roots, it has to do with the whole education system. We, since primary school through middle school, high school till College, were always taught to follow the teacher’s ideas not ours. Once in college, we realize that we can’t find our own voice. Especially in Art College, we look for freedom, but we also need to consider the teachers’ opinion where the restrain comes from.

Speaking of the large environment, actually, most of the time, the market also doesn’t really appreciate what you created. You may make a piece that shows your own character or reflects social issues, or in my case, I tend to add into my design psychological concerns, but I think no one really understands. Most people value things by standard criteria, basically western standards of either minimalism or extremely luxury. So I think the restraining element is strong. Asian art is like a dead Hutong.

Students at The Central Academy of Fine Arts

Let’s face it, the structure of the fashion industry itself (like many others) is fundamentally unsustainable from an environmental perspective: from cotton farming, to the divisions of labor in the production process, to the consumer practices that it requires to maintain itself.

There is already a huge excess of garments existing in the world, how could we imagine making more? This is part of the system that for better or worse defines the structures through which we live. Fashion is important to us because it connects to our everyday experience; it remains a potent field for discussions about self-identity, notions of authenticity, consumer culture, personal desire and how this affects creative production.

And we should clarify that when we use the term sustainable it’s more in this kind of context. It’s about taking a more subjective approach trying to define what ‘sustainability’ means on a much more personal, individual level.

Our definition of sustainable living stems from the every day social, cultural, economic and environmental contexts of the ffiXXed designers, ffiXXed producers and ffiXXed consumers, with enjoyment, comfort and stability.

ffiXXed

The thing is to imagine a working day in a factory, optimized conditions and management (so time is counted almost perfectly); within this closed, efficient system, I claim a space (that is included in the factory policy, as I am a manager…) and a span of time during which I ask them to do whatever they feel like, something related to what is around them, not functional, poetic, ironical or even just funny; so it is not so much about what they do with this time, but simply the fact that they own it… and I was worried that they would simply find this situation useless or banal, but instead some of them really interpreted it as a chance to “do” something… to communicate something… to express something… I could tell this by the quality and the accuracy of some of their texts, their drawings, their projects ideas… they did not take this as leisure, but as a window… maybe conscious about it?

Maybe not? But it happened. It was fresh and surprising….they were free not to take part (several did not) or they might simply do this to respect the weird new order from the management… or interpret this as an eccentric invention of the boss, but although these thoughts might have cross their mind, they actually engage with this seriously and creatively… this was really a gift to me…. it was not granted… it was not given… no matter how much pressure they might feel from the fact that I was there with the authority of a manager… and actually at the time of the SUIBIAN project, the Social Sensibility Program did not exist, and I was just experimenting… it is after the results I got from SUIBIAN that the idea of creating a program was born.

There is something important linked with time and function, space and task to accomplish; to be able to interrupt this in its specific context and territory and allow something totally different to happen is an experience through which the possibility of a “difference” is not just suggested but made it real, for a little while…but happening, with the documentation of the gestures, actions and thoughts there to prove the existence of this event. The event cannot but leave some traces; no matter how aware or unconscious they are, because an important negotiation has happened about something that normally is not negotiable: working time.

Alessandro Rolandi, Social Sensibilities R&D

The first time I was in Chengdu was for the Biennale. I don’t like the city. But I really like the people, their life there. They enjoy the weather, and they’re happy there.

They live a simpler life maybe. Work in the family’s shop, less worries. Less stress.

Slow life. There’s an interesting thing in Chengdu- have you heard of “the voice of China”? It’s a music show, with judges who decide if you’ll be a star or not.

Ahhh… I hate that!

In Chengdu, when there’s a competition there, the girls in Chengdu really want to join it. They’re eager to show themselves and be on TV.

Somebody told me Chengdu has the most beautiful girls in China?

Yeah, yeah, yeah! And also, they really like to show off themselves, by clothes, by singing or by TV. That’s why Chengdu is a special city.

Because they like to show off?

Yes. Because everybody there lives a slow life, but all the girls want to be stars. It’s interesting.

Haha, yes!

So that’s why I think that Chengdu is really China right now.

Like a good representation of China?

Yes, because China is not a very fast moving country, and the culture too. But the young people, they want to show themselves.

Dooling Jiang, Digest Design

What about your upcoming exhibition in Stockholm? What are you showing there?

Since the exhibition is in a kind of museum, I have to choose what I show according to that. It’s quite restricted, no sexual content. Also, the curator is Chinese too, and he’s worried what would happen if word got back that the exhibition had been showing outlawed content. It would be controversial. I used to think that exhibiting abroad would be quite unrestricted, but after I went abroad I saw that galleries and museums everywhere have many restrictions as to what can be shown.

Is it easy to get a visa to travel abroad?

If you have an invitation letter it’s pretty easy. You still have to do a lot of work to prepare though, showing certificates etc. There was one photographer who applied for a visa and took one of the photo books he had his photos published in to show. It had nudes taken by other photographers too, so he was close to being denied the visa. When I apply for a visa I show different types of photos, and I say I do ‘beauty’ photography.

Do you have your own website?

I used to have one, but it had so many visitors that it got blocked. But I’m planning to set one up on servers abroad, and I use Flickr and tumblr.

Do you ever ‘jump the wall’ [expression for evading the ‘Great Firewall of China’ net censorship]?

No, I don’t. I kind of live in my own world. When I travelled I saw the newspapers’ coverage of China. What they report is still very one-sided, focusing on the negative parts only. So, I’d rather not see what they have to say.

Ren Hang

5 digital

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